Subscribe to The Polymer Arts magazine

IMG_5862 (FILEminimizer)First of all, thank you to everyone who chimed in with their thoughts this week. It was really kind of amazing. Did you enjoy this little experiment? Should we do this semi-regularly? If so, I’ll try to do this one day every couple weeks or so in order for me to have time to arrange the giveaways and still have time to read all your comments and toss back some ideas too.

The plan for that this week kind of got thrown out the window, or I would have had more to say as the week progressed. The technical issues we were having took a couple days to resolve then there was catching up to be done. The printer was very patient as we got everything back up and files fixed, but it did delay production, so we have to reset the release date of the winter issue to December 3rd. That’s when the digital issue will be released and is the first possible day shipped issues could begin arriving. We are really sorry for the delay, and we are making appropriate adjustments and sacrifices to the techie gods in hopes this doesn’t happen again!

kopilka gel laceIn the meantime, I will pull a name for the drawing and announce it on Monday. And you call feel like winners with these couple of free online tutorials that are interesting holey and lacy techniques to try this weekend.

The first one is from Ange of AB Creations. Taking punched holes and creating a domed bead from a collection of punched dots and holes. Genius! Find all the details on Ange’s blog here.

The second uses molds or texture sheets to create polymer lace with liquid polymer. Both these techniques are so full of possibilities! The author of this liquid lace tutorial is Mary Kosovo. You will need some oven-safe molds or textures for this one.

Now go out and have fun this weekend!

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

Van der

Moving away from polymer for your opinion today, I thought we’d look at a ceramicist because, for one, it’s another type of clay, so it should be easy to translate what you think of polymer into ceramics, and, two, holey ceramics is a little unusual and really, really cool.

Simon van der Ven returns again and again to these delicate ceramic structures, many with a lot more holes than you see here. What you think of the form? How about the combination of smoother leaves breaking into a very different kind of texture? Do you think this would have benefited from more color? Why or why not?

I think we will make this the last day of entering the drawing by commenting, and I’ll get you some fun holey and/or lacy techniques to consider for tomorrow. So, get your thoughts in today. We’ll get another drawing going soon, but thank you all for participating in this one!

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

travio10nov 004rLet’s do something a little different with our participation week today. This image does not contain  finished pieces, but rather they are a technique developed by Violette Laporte. You can go here to read about what she was doing and her thoughts, but what I’d love to see is your thoughts, not on the design, but on what you would do with these to finish them. Or, how would you apply this technique to things you already do? Even if it’s not your kind of thing, try to think of a way you could incorporate it into your work.

Also, if you go ahead and actually make something from this, please send me photos! I would love to see what this post might inspire!

And, don’t forget to go back to the previous day’s posts to see how your observations compare to other peoples. There is an amazing amount of similarity in comments. I got to speed read through them all, but we still had technical problems to fix yesterday, and today, I am getting on the road for some time with family and my other half. But you know, I’ll be here every day too!

 

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

dina kovalkina marine bracelet

First of all, thank you everyone for participating in Monday’s fun and games. You all are amazing! I was going to go through and pick some favorite comments to post today, but I’m afraid we’ve been having some serious technical issues over that have kept me from being able to read them all thoroughly yet. And apparently kept this from posting–that was user error, tired user that is. I’m sorry about that. I will get to all the comments later today, but you can read all the great observations by returning to Monday’s post and reading the comments below it.

Let’s keep this going! All participants will be tossed into the hat for the product giveaway at the end of the week.

Today we’ll ponder this set of holey bracelets by Dina Kovalkina. I found this on her Flickr page where you can look at more of her work if that helps you to learn more about what she’s doing and why. What do you think about the placement of the holes; their density? How do the elements from the holes to the ruffled edges work together or do they? How about the colors?

Let me know your thoughts! I’ll get back to fixing technical stuff and we’ll get back on track tomorrow!

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

So, last week I was having an email conversation with the fabulous Debbie Crothers of Australia. We’re both ideas people with minds going a million miles an hour. At one point she said, “I absolutely love reading your blog. I try and do my own little analysis of the work before I read yours, and it’s always so interesting and educational reading your view on each piece.” Which was kind of funny because I’ve been trying to think of a way to encourage people to do just that–make their own decision about what is working or not in the piece before reading my thoughts. They are only my thoughts. I don’t always hit the mark, and I sometimes miss things I should have seen. But with thousands of eyes on this every day, I thought we could get a more well-rounded view of the work sometimes.

So, Debbie and I bantered back and forth about how to do that and came upon this very simple idea–I’ll present work, give you background and ask that you comment. Then we’ll publish some of the comments the next day, and I’ll add thoughts if any are needed. This way we’ll have readers chiming in like a true discussion. Sound like fun?

It also occurred to me that this is chance to work in more giveaways! I’ve started collecting items and getting some teachers and retailers on board, so we can have these interactive moments on the blog more often, spurred on by the chance to win some cool polymer related products or publications.  So … are you ready to try this out? I’ll put the participation details below.

organika7-bigHere is a piece by Ivana Brozova I picked out last week as I looked for ‘hidden’ type designs. As it so happened, I was gathering a lot of pieces that were more about being lacy or holey, so I saved them for this week. I couldn’t wait to share Ivana’s work, though. Fantastic organic textures are everywhere in explorations that she conducted at the end of last year. You can see these both on her Flickr page and her website.

What you think about the color choices here? Do you think the lace quality of the structure helps or distracts from the design? Or do other aspects strike you first?

Put your thoughts in the comments below the blog post. That means, if you are getting this by email or RSS, or reading it on the opening page of the blog, you’ll want to click on this post’s heading to get to its dedicated page. Comments can be inserted at the bottom of that page. Be sure your correct email is in your ID information, and we’ll pull an email address at the end of the week and announce the winner on Monday. I will offer the winner a few options from my stash, so there should be something exciting for everyone. This week I’ll be offering Sculpey texture rollers, bead rollers or a set of floral texture sheets from a couple different manufacturers … or a $10 certificate toward any subscription or back issue of The Polymer Arts will always be an option. It’ll be your choice.

Comment before midnight Eastern Standard Time to have a chance to see your words on the blog site.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

IMG_4142I’ve been wanting to do a hollow lentil bead with a peek-a-boo hole in it all week, but it’s a rather common design these days, at least as a base form. Some people are doing beautiful things with it, but I felt it ought to be really different and objects well recessed, so they look more hidden, and that was harder to find. Then I remembered these window-like hollow lentils Wendy Orlowski created a couple years ago.

Down below the lip of the open window in the one on the right, you can see what looks like a nest with an egg inside it. I wish I could get a closer look. But, this is what I’ve been talking about all week. You know something is there, and our natural curiosity pushes us to look closer to get a better look at it. We simply like the surprise of hidden things. This is a great addition to a piece in that there is definitely more than meets the eye when there is something sitting just inside, beyond our view.

Wendy mentions that she had planned to create a tutorial of this, although I couldn’t find one. If you are interested, you might want to give Wendy a shout through her Etsy shop or with the contact information on her blog. In case you didn’t know, Wendy is the designer who created CaBezels, which I highly recommend. They are a lifesaver for quick and easy bezels to show off your great surface treatments or faux stones. You can find them on her Etsy site as well through Shades of Clay.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

Andy Rogers clam_seed_N3Most of what we see in nature has a very particular purpose or is an expected result of some process or circumstance. Something a person makes, well … it can be such a mystery! When something in nature opens up to reveal its treasure, usually it is something that has to do with its survival–seeds in a pod, a pearl in a oyster shell, the brightly colored interior and/or stamens in a flower. But, when man makes something that is opened to reveal something, it can be simply a show of that artist’s aesthetic, or it can be a statement.

Which do you think we have here? Andy Rogers is heavily influenced by nature, but he will mix up the components, so you have to stop and think about what it is he’s showing us. This form with its alien-looking exterior and mysterious red seeds feels like both his aesthetic and a statement about our curiosity. This is just one in a series, and one of the few whose seeds can be seen in the photographs. But, many of the other ones have truly hidden treasures stashed away where you have to be in its presence and take a peek inside to see what Andy has to show you.

Since we can’t see what he has inside from his photos, go ahead and jump over to his page and take guesses at what forms and colors might be the most eye-catching or surprising to find inside these forms. Would that get you thinking about what could be hiding in your own work? It’s kind of fun to consider! While you’re there, take a look at the rest of Andy’s gallery. I think his forms, colors and textures are particularly inspiring for the polymer artist, especially if your aesthetic leans towards the organic.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front      TPA Blog Newsletter Ad  ShadesofClay 1014 v2  lpedit  

Other Things You Might Like ...:

The pull to look inside something to find out what cool thing might lie within it is quite strong. And, so is the let down when there is nothing there. I am quite the proponent for avoiding viewer disappointment. If you build a  box, a lidded bowl or something with a deep cavity of any […]

It would be particularly difficult to pass up a week dealing with the hidden and barely glimpsed without bringing up a huge influence of mine in that area, Wiwat Kamolpornwijit. Hiding little handcrafted roses and gems beneath strips or folds of clay or held by a lattice work of polymer to faux metal or black bases […]

As an illustration of how powerful the draw is when we catch just a mere glimpse, a hint, the sight of just a sliver of something, I thought I’d share this pin by Margaret Regan. This is not a new piece, but it has such a classic composition. And tell me that when you look at it, you aren’t […]

I have long had a fascination with spaces that potentially hide things. Caves, crevasses, holes, wells, abandoned buildings and the like. There is  something about the potential of that unknown or hidden that is so enticing. And, it doesn’t have to be dark and mysterious either. Just something that makes one curious. Like these fantastic […]

I thought we’d end this week on depth with an in-depth mini-interview conducted by Randee Ketzel. This time she spoke to Claire Wallis who doesn’t work with illusionary depth, but does explore faux and illustrative techniques quite a bit. Here is what Randee sent to share with us: Claire Wallis is probably best known as the creator […]

I don’t know if it’s fair to say that enamel work can give the illusion of depth because usually you are looking into some depth. Enamel work is commonly layered, so you are seeing light reflected back through various colors and treatments applied in the process of laying down and firing powdered glass. But, if […]

It would be hard to do a week on the illusion of depth without taking a look at one of our foremost masters in the category of mica shift. Dan Cormier and his uncompromising approach has given us some of the most beautiful examples of illusionary depth in polymer. And here’s a treat, even for […]

Here are a couple interesting examples of creating depth using polymer. I thought it was particularly interesting that they are the same forms created by the same artist, who obviously has some interest in the subject. On the left we have some seriously mashed mica shift with a great organic look, while on the right […]

Yesterday we looked at the depth achieved through applying unique polymer techniques that allow for a smooth surface to look like it has variations in the depth of that surface. But this can also be done with some good standard methods of optical illusion as well. MaryKot created this pendant for a challenge using grays on […]