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Although blogs aren’t traditionally considered a form of printed material, our move into the electronic publishing age has sometimes made blogs the only reliable and up to date source for many subject matters. Cynthia Tinapple has made her name as an author through her popular Polymer Clay Daily blog which has become a standard read for any serious polymer artist. Last year, she also broke rank with the typical polymer clay project book format by presenting the  global side of our medium with a lot of background and insight alongside intriguing projects in her book Polymer Clay Global Perspectives

Of course, Cynthia is an accomplished polymer artist as well. My favorite pieces of hers are the collaborations she creates with her wood sculpting husband, Blair Davis. Their polymer trimmed wooden bowls, although reserved in their design, are so eye-catching due to the care and finish of the work as well as the contrast of materials and colors. Most of her inlay is cane work but I found this extruded swirl inlay absolutely entrancing. The swirl of the clay mimics, in a stylized manner, the waves and whorls of woodgrain making the choice an excellent design pairing.

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You can find out all about Cynthia, see her work, find her book and take a look at her adventures all on her website. And of course, if you aren’t already subscribed to Polymer Clay Daily, you really need to get on that!

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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In our little community, we have just a few people who consistently write and publish about our medium. One of our earliest teachers through print and one of the most prolific is Barbara McGuire. She has authored or co-authored half a dozen polymer specific books and has written numerous articles along with her many other contributions to product development, teaching and archiving. Most recently she has been expanding into wonderfully detailed videos which you can get for free on her YouTube channel.

Barbara lives outside Asheville, South Carolina in a rural area where, until recently, she kept a bee colony. Unfortunately, her bees were wiped out and she is in the process of putting money together to build the colony again. That is the inspiration behind her series of bee beads, a collaboration between Barbara and with Thomas Michael Poole who made the bee wings and Klimt patterns seen in the series. Created from layers of canes, the bees on these beads look they just landed there and yet still meld into the complex flow of the colorful backgrounds.

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If you want to help Barbara get back to her beekeeping as well as own a piece by one of our great pioneers, you can purchase her bee beads and necklaces in her Etsy shop. Barbara is even offering our blog readers a 30% discount off items in her Etsy store–just use the code SAVETHEBEES. You can also take a look at more of these wonderful beads and other work by Barabara on her Flicker pages.  And do take a look at her many wonderful products and books she has for sale on her website as well as checking out her class schedule for upcoming opportunities to learn from this master artist.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Since I featured Marjon yesterday, I certainly couldn’t leave her periodicals partner in crime,  Saskia Veltenaar, out of this look at the art of our polymer publication people. I suspect that part of the reason they are such close friends is that they are both so much about fun and flair, both in their personalities and their creative endeavors. Last year, Saskia went quite floral with a series of colorful pieces with botanicals emerging from textured black backgrounds. Bright colors against black really make the colors stand out and Saskia and her bubbly personality never seems to be afraid to stand out!

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Saskia shows off her many talents including beading, fiber and metal work on her beautifully composed website and on her Flickr pages.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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As I prepare for EuroSynergy, my mind is especially keyed in on our Polymer in Print presentation. Obviously, I have quite the interest in this area and the outcome of the survey we did a few weeks ago was extremely enlightening.  I am very excited to get to see many of the people who are key to what is available in print for polymer, both in the past and present, while in Malta.  It made me realize how busy most of us are, that even though we are artists, our work doesn’t get seen much (or we don’t get into the studio much to start with being so busy with publications) so this week, let’s highlight some of our publishing mavens and their artistic talent.

My counterparts over at “From Polymer to Art” have been a bit more active in creating their own work than I probably have been the last couple years. I think of Marjon Donke, co-founder and co-editor of FPTA, as the queen of dots. I think she wore something with dots at least every other day at last year’s Synergy. This pendant of hers with a sampling of dots as surface design is rather typical of her fun work and her fun personality!

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Marjon’s work can be found at a number of places on the Internet as well as in their magazine which she regularly contributes to. Primarily you can find her work on Flickr and her own website and the fun and entertaining From Polymer to Art magazine.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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This Canadian artist, Shireen Nadir, is passionate about arts and crafts and admits that she is just learning about polymer.  Because she likes working in textiles, especially knitting and weaving, she decided to try a knitting technique with the polymer bangle bracelet shown here. She gives a complete tutorial on her blog “The Blue Brick” for making this bracelet, as well as tutorials on other projects.

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Shireen works as a photographer, and if you would like to know more about her, check out her website. Hope you had a lovely Easter or Spring Holiday with your family and friends.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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This necklace by Aussie artist Robyn Gordon has a quilted textile feel to the shell designs used in the pendant and beads. The beads are shaped like turret sea snail shells while the pendant is an assemblage of several shell shapes. The details on the shells have faux sewing patterns and the beads are similar to rolled fabric beads. This particular necklace is made from polymer clay and silk thread and is part of the Powerhouse Museum Collection in Sydney, Australia.

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Even though Robyn’s background is primarily in drawing, painting, and mixed media work, she was drawn to polymer jewelry adornment because it provides a direct communication between maker and wearer. If you would like to know more about this artist, browse through her website or take a peek at her gallery page.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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From these fabulous bowls light, airy appearance, you might think they are made from feathers. But no … textile artist Anne Honeyman makes these bowls entirely from thread. The ones pictured here are from her Cottage Garden, Miniature, and Gold Edge bowl collections. I bet one could get a similar effect with polymer clay by using thin extruded coils and feathering the edges. You would just need a nice round bowl (or whatever shape appeals to you) to form it on.

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Anne’s work is drawn from nature as well as man’s impact upon it through the ages. She specializes in free machine embroidery, but draws on a wide range of techniques to realize her ideas. Much of her work could be the basis for polymer inspirations as you can see on her website, in her Etsy and on her Folksy pages.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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This animal print bracelet made by Slovenian artist Tina Mežek is another good example of what could be fabric inspired polymer clay. The rich, bold, earthtone color choices are typical of animal print fabrics and the textured surface gives this bangle the feel and look of a base covered in a rich woven cloth. Tina is [...]

As we look at polymer clay inspired by fabrics, this necklace by Eva Haskova, from the Czech Republic, looks much like woven ikat cloth. If you are not familiar with ikat, it is a dyeing technique that uses a resist dyeing process to pattern textiles. This style of tie-dye originated in Indonesia, and because of [...]

Boldly printed cotton fabrics were rather popular when I was growing up but the patterns were not very exciting. In art school I jumped at the chance to take a silk screen printing class and create my own. It was great fun but a ton of work. So much so that I never made anything [...]

I have meet a lot of polymer artists who had, and usually  still have, a love affair with fiber and fabrics. I think it must be the similar breadth of possibility in color and textures found in fiber arts that attract polymer artists to it as well. So, it’s no surprise that many polymer artists look [...]

Now that we’ve been looking at rings all week, are you not excited to try your hand at this form or expand on what you’ve done in the past with rings? There are a number of online sources including classes at Craft Art Edu or the expansive article on creating rings in the Winter 2012 [...]

Here is a bit of both wild and Spring to celebrate the changing landscape up here in the northern hemisphere. Isabelle Chatelain favors sparkling color associations and uncommon mountings as you can see in this wild but fun, Spring inspired ring. There is so much life and vitality in her expressive, modern jewelry designs. Her mix [...]

Rings can truly be made from any material but rings from metal are really the standard due to their durability. Some might say the downside is that we end up with rings primarily created in the limited palette of metallic colors. Granted the accent color of stones can add some amazing hues not to mention [...]

There is definitely something to be said for being forced to come up with a piece in a limited amount of time. You can’t spend too much time deliberating and you tend to kick your inner critique to the curb because you just don’t have time to care that much. Also, the simple rule … [...]

Another design idea based on spanning the distance across the fingers along with including kinetic design in a ring can be found in one of Donna Kato’s first spinner rings. These rings have an element that will actually twirl when you spin them.  In this one it’s obviously the central red bead but the striped [...]