Mixing in Mosaics

This seems to be the week of mixing it up with polymer as well as intricate pieces. Here we have one of Susan Crocenzi‘s amazing mosaics that includes glass as well as polymer to build up an almost textile feel to this wall piece. The mosaic has a natural rhythm and flow of materials that allows the story to unfold sincerely. As Susan explain it, “Mosaic art offers us the sweet possibility that our own crazy, disjointed life-bits can yield peace, beauty, and meaning.”

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This California artist teaches classes at her Grass Valley studio. To view more of her mosaics and learn more about her work, visit her Flickr site. There are more beautiful examples of her mosaics on her Facebook page. “Susan makes mosaics on steroids.” –Carol Herschieb, director of Nevada County Open Studios Tour.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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The Complexity of Animals

This fantastical creature is part of the series “Creatures from El” by Canadian artist Ellen Jewett. All of the swirls and scales movement are portrayed using textures and the wave of the dragon’s body. The dragon appears like stop animation … he is caught for a moment in time … so that we might enjoy his magnificence. This piece is a moving biological narrative, expressing emotions, movement, balance, and observations about life’s overtures and subtleties. This artist works with the principle that materials should conform to her vision, rather than confine her vision to the limits of materials.

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As might be evident in her work, Ellen has extensive education in post-secondary Biological Anthropology and has been pursuing graduate work in anthrozoology. To enjoy the magnitude of her vision, take a look at her Etsy site, and read her journal entries on deviantart.com. When she is not too busy creating new work or filling custom orders, she hopes to resume private lessons in sculpture and stop motion animation, as well as her online tutorials.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Intricately Layered

Israel’s Lesya Binkin produces intricately layered pendants and other polymer based jewelry. She is no polymer purist, tossing in a bit of this and that to create pieces that are not at all defined by the materials.

Lesya’s posts on her website, “My 7-years professional experience as a graphic designer at fashion field determines the main line at my polymer clay jewelry-making. It is multi-layer and graphic, made with the same principle as ones used at computer graphic programs. I mix layers and objects using various materials such as colorful metal leaf, metal powders and spangles in different color combination and shapes.” I don’t know about you, but I highly approve of the end result!

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Her shapes and layers vary widely so don’t miss out on the very many incarnations of this heavily layered approach by heading over to her Flickr photostream or her website.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Lost in the Intricacy

I have, piling up in my Pinterst boards, pocket pages and research folders, all this really intricate, time consuming work that I’ve been wanting to share. I guess this will be the week to do that!

This first piece just fascinates me. I used to do quite a bit of carving, in all kinds of mediums. It’s extremely zen and therapeutic but I’ve done very little in polymer. That is probably a big reason why I like this piece so much. I could see its creator, Belarus’ Anna Anpilogova, spending hours carving out all this texture, lost in the emergence of the layers as she carved into the polymer over and over again. It’s got my fingers itching to try some myself!

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Anna’s polymer work is quite tactile and intricate, usually with an organic or nature inspired theme. Her collection of work on her Flickr photostream and LiveJournal pages can get you as lost in a trance as I imagine doing all the carving would.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Sneak Peek at the Spring 2014 issue

Today, we’re covering some public service announcements about the new issue just released. We’ll get back to regularly scheduled art work tomorrow getting into ‘intricate’ design for this coming week. So, here are share-able items, and the timeline for delivery, if you don’t have yours yet, below.

The latest issue of The Polymer Arts is out! Spring 2014–Wrap it Up was challenging to put together but it sure was worth it! Here is a small sampling flipbook of the issue if yours hasn’t arrived yet or you haven’t decided to buy it yet.

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If you want to share this fun little flipbook or news about the magazine’s release, you can post this link: http://goo.gl/OkVlyX which goes to the flipbook or copy any of these images and link to www.thepolymerarts.com so people know where to get their own copy.

Your Copy of Spring 2014:

  • Digital issues were released on Friday the 7th so if you expected a digital access email but haven’t seen one yet, check your spam/junk mail folder for it and if it’s not there, write us at connect@thepolymerarts.com. Don’t forget to add connect@thepolymerarts.com to your safe sender list and/or address book to help keep emails from being filtered to junk mail.
  • Print issues started mailing out on Wednesday from Idaho. They can take up to 3 weeks to get some areas in the East, South and overseas but they are all on their way.
  • If you don’t buy a copy of this issue yet, you can get your copy at our website or through one of our online retailers listed on that page as well.

 

Thank you all for your many kind and enthusiastic words about this issue you’ve sent my way the last couple days! And thank you ever so much for sharing the issue on your Facebook page, Pinterest and other online sites. It is very heart-warming to see how thrilled you all are about this issue. It is pretty amazing just how many people got involved in the content, contributing their thoughts, art work and talent into making this one very packed issue! Thanks to you all!

Spinning Off

For this Saturday, here is a bit of fun asymmetry composed from elements not aligning. In this case, these earrings by Elvira Krick consist of incomplete circles  whose breaks sit at different positions make the line kind of rock back and forth. But then, free them from hanging in the same flat plane as shown in the right side image, and you have a number of new asymmetrical compositions and, still with a kinetic feel to them.

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Elvira hails from Amsterdam where she creates jewelry from a variety of materials including glass beads, metals, and fiber as well as polymer clay. Check out more of her work on her Flickr page and in her Etsy shop.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Outside Inspiration: Hanging Felt

Asymmetrical composition is common in every artistic area so choosing just one for today’s outside inspiration was tough. This necklace has been on one of my Pinterest boards for a while though so this seemed like a great chance to share it.

Felted jewelry is becoming more common and the felters are getting quite creative. I like this example by Nadine of Dans Mon Corbillon, not because it’s the most creative but because of it’s intricacy and use of other materials including beads and what I think are feathers. It’s just so full of varied textures. The variation and asymmetrical arrangement could have looked a bit too chaotic but I think it comes across as rather celebratory instead, the way nature can get at the peak of the season when all the foilage and flowers are taking over. (and those of us in the Northern hemisphere are sure looking forward to that!)

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You can look at more of Nadine’s gorgeous work on her Flickr site and her blog.

By the way, the Spring issue of The Polymer Arts came out today. If you are due a digital issue but it’s not in your inbox, look in your spam/junkmail folder as they can be sometimes be routed there. If you are waiting on a print issue, they were sent to the post office in Idaho on Wednesday to be processed so most people will be getting those next week or the week after if you are in the east or far south of the States or overseas. Due to cuts in postal services  a few issues took over three weeks in the US and some places in Europe last time but be patient. They are on their way!

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Bringing it Back to Center

Although this pin by Kay Bonitz is asymmetrical, the pin uses the rule of thirds that we innately identify as balanced. The rule of thirds is a theory that says we recognize beauty and balance in images and objects whose proportions can be split into thirds. Our bodies are composed of elements that are built primarily on mirrored parts but all our limb to torso proportions and many facial proportions can be broken down into thirds which is why we likely identify with other items with proportions in thirds. In this case, Kay also has added further balance by using the feathers to create a center focal point.

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Kay, who is a retired accountant, has moved from counting numbers to counting beads. She is actually a beading artist who embellishes her polymer clay creations with beads and feathers. You can see more of her work and learn more about this artist on her website.

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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Disconnected Balance

This stunning necklace, titled “Eleganz”, by Ingrid Ulrich is another example of asymmetry in design. This German artist uses a wire form to create a unique one-of-a-kind wrap necklace that has to balance both visually and physically!

With a limited color palette, Ingrid uses textures and finishes to add depth and volume to the individual elements to form a cohesive whole. She uses a synthetic clay (Künstlerton) and fires it at a constant temperature for 60 minutes to give this necklace its strength and rigidity. She mixes her finishing techniques so that some of the surfaces are polished to a high shine and others are a matte finish.

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For a more in-depth look at Ingrid’s work, take a look at her website and her Flickr pages. She is fascinated by polymer clay and says, “It livens up the fantasy and gives therapy to the soul, but it also makes addictive to more and more perfection.”

 

If you like this blog, support The Polymer Arts projects with a subscription or issue of The Polymer Arts magazine as well as supporting our advertising partners.

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