Looking at the Big Picture

LMika Peace be with youThis week, I will be needing to step back as much as possible as my family is gathering to celebrate my father’s life.  But I am not going to leave you without some pretties and something to ponder so I am dashing off and scheduling posts for you to enjoy through the start of next week but they will be a bit light on the chatter.

I will leave you with some key words and questions and your mission, if you choose to accept it, is to fill in the blanks, so to speak. Try to answer the questions I pose or verbalize what works in this piece for you and/or what I might be getting at with the keywords and questions I leave. Thinking through what works in a design is a great exercise for helping hone one’s innate design sense.

It would be wonderful and rather enlightening for you and other readers if you add your thoughts in the comment section at the bottom of this post so we can all read what other people see in  the work. If you get this by email, click the title of the post in the email to be taken to the website then scroll down for the comment section.

Okay, let’s start with a little message from Laurie Mika. This message might be helpful for many of us, especially considering the many sad and scary news stories lately. What message–not just the words–do you get out of this piece when you consider the colors and patterns alongside the words? How do you feel about the preponderance of red? Do you think the long vertical shape adds, deletes or plays a neutral part in the work? What do you like most and least about the piece?

Go ahead and take a peek at more of Laurie’s soulful work.

_________________________________________

Like this blog? Lend your support with a purchase of The Polymer Arts magazine and visit our partners.

Claysino Banner 150x150 2 2017 1 e1491928649816 - Looking at the Big Picture    businesscard-3.5inx2in-h-front

  never knead -july-2015c-125

The Great Create Sept 15 blog   Shades of Clay Sept 15 Blog

_________________________________________

4 comments

  1. Although it has a riot of different colors the fact that they are all rich shades ties them together with red being the uniting color. There is a symmetry of basic shapes with a rhythm of detail like an exotic oriental rug. Repeating details keep the eye interested yet there is so much to look at! The motifs stand alone and are framed so that they become important focal points. I love this piece. It seems ancient and totally intriguing. I just have to keep looking!

  2. Sage, I do get the blog via email and I keep forgetting that this is the way to comment. Just wanted to send love and thank you for the pictures AND the words which on many an occasion have prompted thought and action! Hugs to you and your family and wishes for loads of compassionate grit.

  3. I like the red. Red to me is not and angry color, but a warmth color, and there is enough cool colors in this composition to keep the red from being too brash. Plus it is not a bright, cherry red. I like the long format; in general I prefer sizes and shapes that are out of the norm. It makes it even more interesting. With so many different textures and colors, it’s comforting to see that with all that variation, it still can be one, cohesive piece.

  4. This mosaic makes my heart sing!

    I love this work, as the colours instantly resonate with me, Those reds and blues are just delicious. They hold all the colours together well. I like the vertical triptych arrangement, it is great for narrow spaces and would give any space a greater sense of height.

    The mosaic itself feels peaceful and joyful at the same time. It has a positive uplifting “spirit” and offers the calmness and vibrancy of much loved age old traditional folk art. The patterns are delightful together due to the colour choices.

    It is refreshing to know that artists get joy out of creating detailed colourful works in a time when the trend pushes towards muted, graphic and minimalist design.

    This work looks less iconic and more decorative than many of Laurie’s works. I love it and the message it offers.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: